History

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2019-03-04 : Official opening of Prime-Wiki
2018-12-07 : M51 = 282,589,933-1 is reported prime.
2018-12-05 : PrimeWiki was established, restoring of old pages began.
 
2018-08-31 : Mersennewiki goes offline.
2017-12-26 : M50 = 277,232,917-1 is reported prime.
2016-01-13 : Multiple independent verification runs prove M49 is prime.
2015-09-17 : M49 = 274,207,281-1 is reported prime by a computer belonging to Curtis Cooper; but the discovery goes unnoticed until January 7.
2013-02-05 : Checks prove M48 and a press release is issued.
2013-01-25 : M48 discovered by GIMPS / Curtis Cooper.
2011-12-01 : Double-checking proves M(24036583) is the 41st Mersenne prime.
2011-03-11 : The Mersennewiki now features 300 articles.
2010-07-11 : Double-checking proves M(20996011) is the 40th Mersenne prime.
2009-04-12 : M47 = 242,643,801-1 is reported prime by a computer belonging to Odd Magnar Strindmo; but the discovery goes unnoticed until June 4.
2008-09-06 : A 10 million digit long Mersenne prime is found by Hans-Michael Elvenich. This is second Mersenne prime discovered out of order since 1988. If it had been found just 2 weeks earlier, it would have won the $100,000 EFF prize
2008-08-23 : A 10 million digit long Mersenne prime is found by one of the University of California, Los Angeles computers running GIMPS, managed by Edson Smith. This is long enough to qualify for the $100,000 prize offered by the Electronic Frontier Foundation. The new Mersenne prime is 243,112,609-1.
2007-03-26 : Konstantin Agafonov finds that 19249 × 213,018,586 + 1 is prime. This 3,918,990-digit prime is the tenth success of Seventeen or Bust project.
2006-09-11 : Tony Reix finishes verification of this 44th Mersenne prime using 16 Itanium2 1.5 GHz in six days.
2006-09-04 : A Mersenne prime is found by Dr. Curtis Cooper and Dr. Steven Boone's CMSU team again and verification starts. The new Mersenne prime is 232,582,657-1
2005-12-24 : Tony Reix finishes verification using 16 Itanium2 1.5 GHz running Glucas.
2005-12-15 : One of the 700 computers at the Central Missouri State University run by Curtis Cooper and Steven Boone (the CMSU team) finds the 43th known Mersenne prime: 230,402,457 - 1.
2005-10-19 : Double check finds that 4847 × 23,321,063 + 1 is prime. This 999,744-digit prime is the ninth success of Seventeen or Bust project.
2005-10-19 : The Mersennewiki now features 100 articles.
2005-09-06 : The Mersennewiki goes online.